Young child watering garden

Our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Girl in the arms of father in a field

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Baby gazing at the viewer

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Young girl sitting in park

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Mother gazing down at baby

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Gavin McCormack and children

Teachers shape the future of our world. They educate our future leaders, and the responsibility of our planet lies in their hands. Quite often we don’t give teachers the credit they deserve. I mean, first of all they spend all day with kids!

Something that would drive most of us mad. But beyond that they do so much more. Not only do they teach our children but, because they spend more time with our children than we, as parents do, they are trusted with caring for their wellbeing, both socially, mentally and physically.

Child in Montessori classroom writing Chinese characters

In a Montessori classroom all children work at their own pace and rhythm, taking into account their interests, strengths and weaknesses.  This means a child with learning difficulties or a  “gifted” child can be in the same class as they are able to work at a level that meets their particular needs.

One of the key characteristics of Montessori education is that it supports individualised learning.  Each child has a tailored programme allowing children to work at their own ability level at a pace that is suitable for each of them as they experience their own learning pathway.

Young child focusing on picture on wall of Montessori classroom

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child and father squeezing juice in Montessori parent toddler group

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Young child washing up in Montessori classroom

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Group of young children and teacher in Montessori infant community

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child in Montessori classroom

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child walking on a line

Practical Life activities in a Montessori classroom assist the child to control and coordinate their moments, and one of the earliest activities introduced in a 3-6 classroom is called “Walking on the Line”.  Montessori saw this as a natural extension of something children liked to do (walking on curbs or tracks) and developed the activity not only to help them control their body, develop balance and perfect equilibrium, but to strengthen the mind’s control of its body’s movements.

Baby held by mother

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.