Child in Montessori classroom writing Chinese characters

In a Montessori classroom all children work at their own pace and rhythm, taking into account their interests, strengths and weaknesses.  This means a child with learning difficulties or a  “gifted” child can be in the same class as they are able to work at a level that meets their particular needs.

One of the key characteristics of Montessori education is that it supports individualised learning.  Each child has a tailored programme allowing children to work at their own ability level at a pace that is suitable for each of them as they experience their own learning pathway.

Young child focusing on picture on wall of Montessori classroom

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child and father squeezing juice in Montessori parent toddler group

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Young child washing up in Montessori classroom

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Group of young children and teacher in Montessori infant community

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child in Montessori classroom

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child walking on a line

Practical Life activities in a Montessori classroom assist the child to control and coordinate their moments, and one of the earliest activities introduced in a 3-6 classroom is called “Walking on the Line”.  Montessori saw this as a natural extension of something children liked to do (walking on curbs or tracks) and developed the activity not only to help them control their body, develop balance and perfect equilibrium, but to strengthen the mind’s control of its body’s movements.

Baby held by mother

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Young child climbing stairs

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child working with Montessori materials

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Child hugging tree

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.

Alumnus Madeline Cross-Parkin has braved mental health challenges on her journey to becoming a passionate classical pianist, Instagram sensation and physics undergraduate student.  

Always top of her class in academics and piano, she reflects fondly on her time at Brisbane Montessori School, from the time she was eight months old to 12 years, and again from 15 to 16 years of age. 

“Primary School was pretty good for me. I started learning piano at Brisbane Montessori School and had lovely teachers who started me off on a path of determination,” Maddy said. 

Practical suggestions for offering encouragement, not empty praise.

Child watering garden

A part of our weekly series of thoughts from Maria Montessori's work and writings - designed to promote further reflection on professional practice.